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2/6/2018 - HP COMPAQ NX9010 Battery all-laptopbattery.com

To prevent global warming, you need to completely change the transportation matrix, replacing the internal-combustion engine en masse. That's Tesla role in the Muskian system.To power Tesla's cars, you need electricity that isn't generated by fossil fuels. That's where SolarCity comes into the picture. Musk wants to capture the free energy of the Sun.And just is case it all goes to hell, the planet become uninhabitable, or an asteroid bears down on Earth, SpaceX is there to, as Musk puts it, make us "multi-planetary." We could use Mars as a lifeboat.Musk's whole system runs on power gathered from the Sun, and if you want to do that at any kind of scale, you need to store the energy. That's where the batteries come in. Tesla wouldn't be Tesla without its innovative, idiosyncratic battery design – thousands of laptop-style lithium-ion cells, wired together. This design enabled Tesla to be the only electric car maker selling a vehicle that delivered range on par with the gas-powered competition.

Over the years since Tesla's founding and Musk's arrival, the company has steadily improved its power-management capabilities. With that has come reduced cost. Until now, those savings went mainly to Tesla owners, who were paying $100,000 for a battery plus a car. But now Tesla wants to put the battery at the center of a save-the-Earth system – making it affordable to acquire one and encouraging at least the beginnings of a major revolution in how customers store and use energy. That's why Musk tweeted about the Thursday event by referring to the batteries as the "missing piece."The point is that Musk has been thinking this way all along. It wasn't like he woke up a year ago and said "Let's do a better job of commercializing our batteries!" The batteries have been a driving force in the Tesla story for its entire history.In case you have any doubt about that, just look at the $5 billion battery factory – the Gigafactory – that Tesla and Panasonic are building in Nevada. Musk wants to be delivering 500,000 cars by 2020. But he's going to need million of li-ion battery cells to power them.

This is how big thinking works. So while Thursday's Tesla announcement might not be quite as sexy as pulling the cover off a hot new car, in the long run, it could matter far more to life on Earth.The New York-based company on Tuesday introduced the Here One, a more polished version of the Here Active Listening earbuds that raised $635,000 on Kickstarter last year — as well as $17 million in funding — and resulted in a waitlist that ran more than 100,000 customers deep. They’re up for pre-order today for $299, with a full release set for sometime this November.For those not familiar with the original Here, the core concept behind the Here One remains the same: to augment and mold the sound of the world around you. Though they look like the kind of truly wireless earbuds we’ve seen from Samsung, Motorola, and others in recent months, they’re closer to in-ear processors — with internals that company CEO Noah Kraft says are “about as powerful as laptops from 5-10 years ago” — than traditional Bluetooth earphones.

So, if you’re walking down a city street, the idea is for you to lessen the sound of passing crowds and screeching cars, without shutting everything out the way a pair of noise-canceling headphones might. If you’re at a concert, you could boost the bass and add effects to what’s playing, similar to how you’d mess with the EQ settings for music on your phone.The company claims that it’s fine-tuned this sort of selective noise filtering with the Here One, making it so you can amplify or cut out specific sounds — boosting the voice in an office, for instance, while drowning the air conditioner — instead of whole frequency ranges. doppler labs here oneDoppler Labs You need to keep the earbuds tied to their companion app to make all this work, but from there you can customize the filtering yourself, or choose from a number of preset settings made for specific scenarios (“Office,” “Airplane,” etc.). The hope is that you won't have to do that, though — Doppler Labs says the app will first put you through a two-minute "onboarding procedure" that lets the Here One automatically tune its filters to your ears.

While the original Here buds were intriguing as a concept, the fact that they couldn’t actually play music limited their appeal. The Here One can work like any other pair of wireless in-ear headphones, which should greatly help their chances. Whether or not their sound will compare to other $300 earphones remains to be seen, though.Still, Doppler Labs is adamant that the Here One’s noise processing puts the earbuds in their own category. Beyond the selective filtering noted above, the company says you’ll also be able to “layer” sounds over whatever you’re hearing.Kraft gives the example of being at a baseball game and having real-time commentary draped over the top, or making it so you can hear cars while you’re streaming music on a bike ride. He says the company is working with “several partners” to expand upon this idea going forward.The problem that might limit all of this is a familiar one: battery life. The company says the earbuds will get about 5-6 hours on average, with that going down to 3-4 through continuous streaming. The case that holds them doubles as a charger, and is said to provide two full charges.

In any case, it’s clear that Doppler Labs has put some thought into the idea of creating a wearable that people could feasibly use all day long. We’ll test the Here One in the fall to see if it lives up to that promise.Today, Google announced the Pixel C, a new tablet hybrid that runs Android, with prices starting at $499.An optional $149 keyboard turns it into a laptop/tablet convertible that looks a lot like the Microsoft Surface Pro 3.The big Pixel C reveal comes not long after Apple announced the iPad Pro, its own tablet-with-a-keyboard. Microsoft is a trendsetter, apparently.I got some brief hands-on time with the Pixel C at Google's event. And I have to say, this thing is looking like a flop.Without the keyboard, it's a pretty standard, if super-high-definition, Android tablet. With the keyboard, it's a half-functional laptop that's not going to win over any converts.In other words, the Pixel C is an Android tablet with a high-definition display and an optional integrated keyboard.

A Google employee explained that the idea of the Pixel C is meant to show off to Android developers where their apps fall short with keyboard controls, and to push the market forward in that regard.If you're not going to use the keyboard, this Google employee agreed, you may as well buy something like the slightly cheaper Nexus 9 tablet, which has a similar form factor.Closed up, it looks like a slim, svelte laptop. It takes its design cues from last year's Google Chromebook Pixel laptop, down to the fact that you can tap the case to see a battery indicator.To make it into a laptop, though, you have to take the keyboard off its magnetic connectors, flip it around, place the tablet flat on top of it, and lift it up to a good viewing angle.The Google staffers in attendance were able to make the process look quick and slick, but attendees — myself included — were pretty clumsy about taking it off and flipping it around.Once it's in place, it looks like ... well, an Android tablet with a keyboard attached.

The keyboard, which connects via Bluetooth, has some cool features. It's backlit and it charges right off the tablet itself while it's folded up, so you'll never have to worry about charging it, in theory.But I found typing to be a little difficult on it. A Google employee assured attendees that the keyboard was actually the same size and proportions as a standard keyboard, but everything just seemed off by a key or two.The Pixel C doesn't even come with a stylus like Microsoft has on the Surface Pro and Apple introduced with the iPad Pro. That's going to make it a harder sell in an enterprise setting, and leave it in the dust with the next wave of productivity apps.So for your entry-level price of $648, you're getting an Android tablet with a cool keyboard, and a bunch of apps that won't work super well with it.Meanwhile, the Surface Pro 3 runs a full version of Windows 10, meaning that you get the entire range of Windows apps.And the iPad Pro comes with some cool new multitasking features that make it easier to get stuff done, plus the support of companies like Microsoft and Adobe to bring specialized versions of their productivity apps.

I'm willing to be proven wrong, and I hope to get more time with the Pixel C soon. But at first blush, this looks like an interesting Google design experiment and little more.The warm weather is upon us, which means it’s just about time for people to start moving around. Maybe you’re heading back home, maybe you’ve got a business trip to make, maybe you’re just starting to plan your next vacation. Whatever the case, a few good gadgets can make hitting the road (or skies) altogether less exhausting. (Relatively speaking.) So below, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite travel-friendly tech. They’re varied, but all of them will help you survive your ride in their own way.Whether you’re riding shotgun with the family or stuck on a cross-country flight, at some point during your trek you’ll probably want everything around you to just shut up. You can try asking politely, but a better idea would be simulating the same effect with a good pair of noise-cancelling headphones.

Bose’s QuietComfort series is the cream of the crop here, and its in-ear QuietComfort 20 is the lightest and most portable of the bunch. It’s also $250. If that’s too much, Phiaton’s BT 100 NC isn’t really close to the QuietComfort’s silencing tech, but it’s more than solid for $100, and sounds pretty great to boot. Just make sure you’re cool with its neckband-style design first.Now, not all of you will need noise-cancelling to enjoy some music on the go. If you’re just looking from something cheap, light, and nice-sounding, I like the detailed and bass-forward sound of the Xiaomi Mi In-Ear Headphones Pro — though by now you should know that there are lots of other ways you can go.For all the devices claiming to threaten its existence, a good laptop is still the most natural blend of “something for entertainment” and “something for getting things done.” They’re eternally good for travel. If you grab a super thin Ultrabook, they’re aren’t much of a hassle to toss in a bag, either.

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2/6/2018 - Lenovo IdeaPad Z580 Battery all-laptopbattery.com

They’re both good machines — although neither is upgradable and 128GB is always a meager amount of storage — but which one is right for you depends on how you use your notebook. If you peruse more casually or travel often, get the MacBook Air. (Or really, the pick below.) If money is less of an object and you’re what people call a “power user,” the MacBook Pro is the better of the two.It's a wonder why most laptops don't follow the Dell XPS 13's lead. Thanks to its absurdly thin bezels, it puts a 13-inch notebook in the body of an 11-inch one. It’s slim and light enough to make the MacBook Air feel out of date. It's a supremely portable device, but it doesn’t hurt that its aluminum chassis is sturdy and smooth as well.If you’re going to shave this much off the frame around the display, the display itself has to be good. Thankfully, the 1080p IPS panel on this configuration is wonderful — it’s not the sharpest you’ll see, but its colors are lively and accurate, and it doesn’t wash out at an angle. It has a matte finish, too, so glare isn’t a problem.

That ultra-slim bezel is the thing to behold, though. “Immersive” is an overused word in tech writing, but this is one of the few products where it genuinely fits. You just want to keep looking at this thing. It forces the webcam off to an awkward spot below the display, but that’s a sacrifice we can live with.The model linked above packs a new Intel Skylake Core i3 processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 128GB solid state drive for $800. If price is a concern, that’s enough to get you through everyday tasks smoothly enough.If you can spare an extra $100, though, this configuration from the Microsoft Store doubles the RAM and steps you up to a more robust Core i5. Higher configurations step up to a super sharp 3200x1800 panel, add more storage, and give you the option of a (glossy) touchscreen, though that's not totally crucial with Windows 10.Generally speaking, the speed and strength on these cheaper models won't wow you, and they can run a little warmer than what’s ideal. For the most part, though, they meet the standards of a modern Ultrabook. The one exception is in battery life, where you can get around 10 to 11 hours on a charge. That’s great.

There aren’t many noteworthy negatives here, but the few that do exist are natural extensions of a device being this slim. The keyboard is laid out well and above-average on the whole, but the keys don’t have as much travel as you could get elsewhere. While the new USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 port helps futureproof the whole thing, you still lose dedicated HDMI and Ethernet ports with devices this thin. (You can buy a Thunderbolt adapter for the former, but that’s a pain.) It’s also worth noting that some user reviews have cited issues with the XPS 13’s trackpad, though we've never had much of any issues.All that said, the XPS 13 is still supremely well-designed, with a good battery, great display, and surprisingly affordable starting price. For us, it remains the best Ultrabook you can buy.If your budget keeps you planted in the midrange, look to the Asus Zenbook UX305CA. This version of the machine gets you 8GB of RAM and a 256GB solid state drive for $650-700 (and sometimes less), which is great value.That it’s made from a solid coat of aluminum that’s simultaneously good-looking, slender (about a half-inch thick), and light (just 2.6 pounds) only adds to the value. Throw in a good 9 or so hours of battery life, a trio of USB 3.0 ports, and a crisp, glare-free 1080p panel and the Zenbook furthers itself as very capable for the money.

But there are compromises, as expected. First and foremost is the Core M processor at the heart of the machine. Though its sixth-gen series is an improvement over its predecessor, enough to make the Zenbook perfectly usable for so-called "everyday use," there’s no getting around the dropoff between it and Intel’s higher-level chips. You can do most of what you need to do, but you still don’t want to push things to their limits.On the flip side, the processor is fanless, which means it creates very little noise as it runs along. And if you want, you can grab an updated model with a faster (though not brand new) fifth-gen Core i5 processor for $750.There are other petty annoyances. The display, while bright, isn’t the best at color reproduction. The keyboard, while comfortable, doesn’t have a backlight. And the speakers are just plain weak.Still, none of that is enough to ruin the bargain. The Zenbook puts sufficient power into a great build. For $650 or so, it’s a worthy MacBook Air alternative for the budget-conscious.Chances are you don’t need a dedicated “business laptop” to get work done. Any of the other picks here are plenty capable of banging out lighter assignments, and more powerful options like the MacBook Pro and Surface Book are general purpose devices that can handle just about anything you throw at them.

Still, some machines are better suited for working on the go than others. Lenovo in particular has built its name in this space, and its new ThinkPad T460 is a dependable choice for the productivity-oriented. It's not quite a looker, but at 3.8 pounds and 0.83 inches thick, it's not as bulky as it could be either.More importantly, it’s tough enough to withstand years of abuse, and it comes with a truckload of connectivity options. Three USB 3.0 ports, an Ethernet port, HDMI and VGA ports, an SD card reader, a SIM card slot, a Kensington lock slot, a mini DisplayPort — most of the dorky extras a heavy-duty user could want are all here, save for a USB-C port. Its batteries are replaceable, too, and you can rest easy if you ever spill coffee all over its spill-resistant keyboard.

About that keyboard: It’s superlative. The travel, the spacing, the little indentations around each key — it’s all conducive to a remarkably fast and comfortable typing experience. If you’re buried in an assignment, it makes digging your way out at least somewhat pleasurable. The touchpad that goes along with it is fine, and the ThinkPad’s signature pointing stick is there for those who need it. You can also add backlighting for a little extra cash. Speaking of paying extra, how the ThinkPad performs depends on how deeply you configure it. While the entry-level model above is affordable, it comes with has a middling 1366x768 TN panel, a sixth-gen 2.3GHz Core i3 processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 500GB hard disk drive. That might be enough to get things done, but not impressively so. Paying up the ladder will get you a decent 1080p IPS panel, along with RAM and an SSD, improving speeds across the board. And if nothing else, you can always open the machine up and add stuff like this yourself.

The same idea goes for the ThinkPad’s battery life: It’s solid on its own, but if you pick up extra swappable batteries from Lenovo, you can easily go a full day before needing to recharge. You can even switch batteries without turning the notebook off. Unfortunately, all of this means that getting the most out of the T460 will cost more than its relatively low starting price would suggest.The ThinkPad T460 isn’t as aesthetically pleasing as an Ultrabook, but it aims at a much more specific crowd than those mainstream machines. It's worth noting that Lenovo does have a notebook that tries the bridge the gap, though — the ThinkPad T460s, which we also tested for this guide. It keeps most of the benefits above while nicely cutting down the size (to 3 pounds and 0.67 inches), but its battery is underwhelming as a result, and it can't be swapped out. Its keyboard gives a little less feedback, too. It's still fine if you value that reduced footprint, but for most professionals, a higher-end configuration of the T460 should be the better way to go.

And now we head to the other end of the spectrum. If you spend most of your computer time in a web browser, consider a Chromebook. These things run Chrome OS, which mostly limits you to staying online and using Google’s services, but that’s enough to do plenty, and the OS itself is only expanding. It also means that the machines don’t need higher-end hardware to run smoothly — as a result, they’re typically very cheap.The best of these, for now, is the Toshiba Chromebook 2. For $300 or so, it gets you a superb 1080p IPS display, an Intel Celeron 3215U processor, 4GB of RAM, a 16GB solid state drive, wireless-ac WiFi, and an excellent 9 to 10 hours of battery life.That 13-inch display is really the highlight: It’s colorful, bright, and accurate, with solid viewing angles. It wouldn’t look too out of place on a $1,000 machine. Our only complaint is that it’s glossy, so you’ll catch some glare in sunlight.

Those internals are modest on paper, but they’re more than enough to run Chrome OS with aplomb. The same Celeron CPU that'd buckle under the weight of Windows 10 runs quickly and smoothly on the Chromebook 2, even with numerous tabs open. A built-in fan keeps everything cool as well. It’s a noticeable improvement over its previous iteration, which struggled to maintain too much at once. Having only 16GB of storage space could be a pain, but again, Chrome OS is really designed to stay in the cloud.All the other boxes are checked off well enough. An improved keyboard is fast, clicky, and well-spaced. (It also has a backlight.) The trackpad is good. The build is sufficiently thin and nicely light. Though its finish isn't premium, it's not ugly. The Skullcandy-tuned speakers are better than what you’ll often find on laptops twice as expensive. There are USB 2.0, USB 3.0, HDMI, and memory card ports as well — far from overwhelming, but about standard for Chromebooks.

Say what you will about Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, there's no question that he's in it for humanity.When he became hyper-rich after eBay bought PayPal, he didn't spend his millions to develop a social media app.Rather, he bought into an electric car company, declared that he wanted to send astronauts to Mars, and invested in solar power.On Thursday, Musk will reportedly reveal two new Tesla products: a "home" battery and a much bigger "utility scale" battery. Effectively, Tesla will offer customers the opportunity to buy (or lease) a Tesla battery without shelling out $100,000 for a Tesla vehicle.If you're a cynic, you might say that Musk is just trying to create a new story for Wall Street, to counter some of the skepticism that's emerged over Tesla's immediate financial prospects. The stock has been trading higher ahead of the announcement, after dipping at the end of last year (it's still well down from its peak of $291, hit last September).You can't look at Musk's companies as ... well, companies. Tesla, SpaceX, and SolarCity (which is actually run by Musk's cousins) taken together are really a system, and Musk is a systems engineer, or designer, or architect (take your pick).

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