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Automatic lathe28/3/2022
Automatic lathe In metalworking and woodworking, an automatic lathe is a lathe with an automatically controlled cutting process. Automatic lathes were first developed in the 1870s and were mechanically controlled. From the advent of NC and CNC in the 1950s, the term automatic lathe has generally been used for only mechanically controlled lathes, although some manufacturers (e.g., DMG Mori and Tsugami) market Swiss-type CNC lathes as 'automatic'.Get more news about Automatic Cnc Lathe,you can vist our website! CNC has not yet entirely displaced mechanically automated lathes, as although no longer in production, many mechanically automated lathes remain in service.The term "automatic lathe" is still often used in manufacturing in its earlier sense, referring to automated lathes of non-CNC types. The first automatic lathes were mechanically automated and controlled by cams or tracers and pantographs. Thus, before electronic automation via numerical control, the "automatic" in the term "automatic machine tool" always referred implicitly to mechanical automation. The earliest mechanically automated lathes were geometric lathes, including rose engine lathes. In industrial contexts during the Machine Age, the term "automatic lathe" referred to mechanical screw machines and chuckers. Since the maturation of CNC, the implicit dichotomy of "manual versus automatic" still exists, but because CNC is so ubiquitous, the term "automatic" has lost some of its distinguishing power. All CNC machine tools are automatic, but the usage in the machining industries does not routinely call them by that term. The term "automatic", when it is used at all, still often refers implicitly to cam-operated machines. Thus a 2-axis CNC lathe is not referred to as an "automatic lathe" even if fully automated. Small- to medium-sized cam-operated automatic lathes are usually called screw machines or automatic screw machines. These machines work on parts that (as a rough guide only) are up to 80 millimetres (3.1 in) in diameter and 300 millimetres (12 in) in length. Screw machines almost invariably do bar work, meaning a length of bar stock passes through the spindle and is gripped by the chuck (usually a collet chuck). As the part is being machined, the entire length of bar stock is rotated with the spindle. When the part is done, it is 'parted' from the bar, the chuck in released, the bar fed forward, and the chuck closed again, ready for the next cycle. The bar-feeding can happen by various means, including pulling-finger tools that grab the bar and pull or roller bar feed that pushes the bar from behind. Larger cam-operated automatic lathes are usually called automatic chucking lathes, automatic lathes, automatic chuckers, automatics, or chuckers. The 'chucker' part of the name comes from the workpieces being discrete blanks, held in a bin called a "magazine", and each one takes a turn at being chucked and machined. (This is analogous to the way that each round of ammunition in the magazine of a semi-automatic pistol gets its turn at being chambered.) The blanks are either individual forgings or castings, or they are pre-sawn pieces of billet. However, some members of this family of machine tools turn bar work or work on centers (e.g., the Fay automatic lathe). Regarding bar work of large diameter (for example, 150 millimetres (5.9 in) or more), it is merely an academic point whether it is called "screw machine work" or just "automatic work".
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