BlogHotel.orgAccueil | Créer un blog | Imprimer la page Imprimer | Blog hasard Au hasard | Chercher des blogs Rechercher | Entrer dans le chat du blog Chat | | Jeux Jeux | Adminitration et édition du Blog Manager

wisepowder Accueil | Profil | Archives | Amis
wisepowder

The Eight Standards of Japanese Beauty13/10/2022
The Eight Standards of Japanese Beauty Since coming here in 2008, I’ve gotten to have some downright fascinating discussions about Japanese culture and why certain aspects of the culture are the way they are. A subject that’s been discussed and rehashed, time and time again, is Japanese beauty. To get more news about 一级毛片在线观看, you can visit our official website. Before you call me a chauvinist and put my head on a spike, please hear me out. I’ve had these conversations with more Japanese women than I have with Japanese men. It’s intriguing to hear how the conversation on “good looks” varies from person to person, from men to women and from country to country. Beauty is a topic that pervades every culture and society. Whenever I overhear, eavesdrop on, Japanese conversations about aesthetics, my curiosity always gets the better of me. While minor things differ from conversation to conversation, some features (whether it was a man or a woman talking) are mentioned over and over again. 1. LIGHT/WHITE SKIN Ayase Haruka is seen as one of the most beautiful actresses/models in Japan. She is known for having beautiful skin. I think I just drooled a bit... While smooth, clear skin is considered a fairly universal standard of beauty, in Japan it seems the lighter the skin tone the more beautiful it is. The Japanese lighter skin phenomenon is a true mystery to me (said the brownest man in the room). Could it be historically linked to Japanese geisha? The 19th century, female entertainers who donned kimonos, white makeup and red lipstick accents; the former pinnacle of Japanese beauty and elegance. 2. THE HIGH-BRIDGED NOSE I remember having to get a CAT scan once at the Tsukuba University Hospital and as I was about the go in, one of the younger female nurses/trainees got super close to my face and told me “Sugoi! Hana ga takai.” She was admiring the bridge of my nose. I found this pretty interesting because in the U.S. I’ve gotten the occasional “big nose” comment, which I never really minded so much. What makes a high bridge nose more desirable in Japan? If we just look at Western vs. Eastern cosmetic surgery patterns, we can get a bit of a hint. It’s always fascinating to find out what kind of cosmetic surgery people have done to make themselves more “beautiful.” 3. SMALL/SLIM FACE After one particular Golden Week holiday (one of the important holidays in Japan), I remember asking a Japanese friend how his vacation was. He had taken a trip to Hokkaido and began to tell me about how good the food was and how beautiful the women were. Curious, I asked him why the women in Hokkaido were so beautiful? “They have beautiful, white skin and slim faces,” he replied. Though it wasn’t an incredibly in-depth discussion about what makes a women pretty here in Japan, I never forgot what he said. 4. THIN/PETITE Do you know the expression “ぼんきゅぼん (Bon Kyu Bon)?” Well in Japanese it’s kind of like onomatopoeia but not exactly. This expression is used when talking about a woman’s body shape. The first “bon” symbolizes a large bust, “kyu” means having a small waist, and “bon” means having a large curve at hips. Bon kyu bon is the Japanese equivalent of an hourglass figure.
Poster un Commentaire

Entry 558 of 2329
Précédent | Suivant

Blog suivant >> Signaler un abus?Haut de page